Monthly Archives: October 2015

So, Spartan Has an App, Sort Of, I Guess

This is a month and a half old news, and it’s a bit of a weird one. Spartan Race released an app in September.

(It released another one in October related to the world championships, but this post isn’t about that one.)

I delayed writing about it because, well, it’s complete shit.

It’s spectacularly shit, like the diaper of a baby with dysentery who burst. So much so, in fact, that I’m not entirely sure it’s meant to exist. This app is bad in a way that’s completely inconsistent with Spartan—there are plenty of things you could criticize about the company, but doing stuff half-baked is not one of them.

So I think the most likely explanation is that the version in the store is an early alpha version that will continue to be worked on. I don’t think Spartan has really promoted it—it doesn’t appear to be on Spartan’s website or promoted on its social media accounts. Maybe Spartan was hacked and they were supposed to have another six months of development for release.

But even if the release was intentional, I don’t think releasing such an alpha version is necessarily a terrible idea. The fact that the app is in the app store doesn’t mean that it can’t or won’t be refined over time. And the very act of producing and publishing the app could catalyze further development. There are times, after all, when you need to make something before you can produce it.

I feel like it’s important to get that rational assessment out of the way. That’s the fair part of this post. The funny part is below, and it won’t be fair. Fair and funny don’t always go together, and this is the internet, where being an asshole is usually rewarded.

So, where was I? Oh yeah, shit.

Let’s go through it component by component:

Spartan App Home PageHome: You start on a list of races, with the obvious implication of “Register here and give us your money now!” I’m okay with that—commerce isn’t fundamentally a bad thing, even if one might wish its excesses could be reined in a bit. But the races are ordered by distance from your location, which isn’t really, you know, good.

The problem with that is, there are really only three distances from you that a race can be. It’s either local, or it requires travel, or it requires international travel. So the app displays Chicago races first, and that’s not bad, but Minnesota vs. Ohio vs. Atlanta vs. Los Angeles—all of those are functionally equidistant. So putting Minnesota next and Los Angeles last is pointless: any of them require a flight or some other major trip, and the length isn’t a particularly important factor in whether or not I decide to make the trip.

Perhaps this distance organization is a bit more useful for people who live in areas that have multiple events. But I have to assume that even they could also get some benefit from a date-ordered list, at least as an option.

One other thing, if Spartan doesn’t want to put races in an obvious order, it might want to use the other information it has. Specifically: Despite being not particularly nearby, I ran the Citi Field sprint in New York this year. My brother lives there, and it takes place at approximately my nephew’s birthday, so it’s a good excuse for me to visit. In other words, its one I’m likely to be interested in for years to come. So why isn’t Spartan making the fairly obvious conclusion that I’m likely to be interested in races I was interested in in the past and moving this one up to that coveted #2 spot.

Anyhow, if you try to register for a race through the app, it takes you to the Spartan website to do it. Which you really don’t need an app to do.

A second tab on the home page will show you photos from your friends. If you have friends who have posted photos to the app. If you don’t have friends, the app will recommend them for you, but the profiles don’t have much in the way of, you know, information. I guess you could just stalk random people, but I have a feeling that would be the least effective stalkery ever.

Spartan App Workouts tabWorkout: This is actually a good idea, but it’s ludicrously badly implemented. This feature allows people to post invitations to public (presumably) workouts that (I think) anyone can come and join in on. I’d actually really like to find some local groups that do OCR-related workouts—not necessarily as my everyday workout, but as a once-a-week kind of thing to mix up training and also have a chance to meet locals in the flesh, rather than through team Facebook pages.

I don’t know if these are ordered by how close they are to you. Many of them I can’t even get a location for. I’ve got an iPhone 5c, which is a bit smaller than the newfangled phones, and it cuts off the location field well before the city and state are fully shown. That’s why I missed the Relays workout in Pisc…

It doesn’t order workouts by date, which is pretty goofy, but even worse: I’m writing this on October 29, and it’s showing me workouts from September 23. I appreciate Spartan’s belief in my abilities, but I am not yet a timelord.

Take a photo: I guess? It’s very possible that this tab was designed by Banksy. It brings up a screen that looks a bit like the iPhone’s camera functionality, only it doesn’t function. I’m pretty sure I can turn the flash on and off, though.

No, seriously. I’m not making this up. This is what the page is.Spartan app photograph tab

Tribes: How many “h”s do I need to convey a sigh lasting fourteen minutes? Because that’s as many as I need to convey how ill-implemented this one is. There are a few public tribes that exist, and if you go to one you get… like, a Bulletin Board from the mid-90s, basically. No threads, just one massive ‘conversation.’

Spartan app tribe chat page

It’s possible to create your own tribe, which can be found by others, if they already know about it. Or if you manage a hit on a blind search. There doesn’t seem to be a directory or anything to actually find new people, though.

More: Which brings up this:

More! From the Spartan AppYou can, apparently, change the volume, even though the app is silent. I wouldn’t mind hearing the conversations that led to that decision (Though hearing those is perhaps what the button is intended to prevent.) Beyond that… oh, just fuck you thrice, Spartan app.

Does the app have a reason to exist? Not in its current state, certainly. If you’ve already got a collection of OCR friends, I can’t imagine you don’t already have better ways to communicate with them.

It might ultimately fill a niche at connecting people who don’t currently know each other but are local to each other and share similar interests. I think there’s a need for that—my experience with Facebook-based teams certainly hasn’t turned up any that function in that way. But in its current form, the app doesn’t do that at all.

I guess I hope it develops into something useful. Will it? I have no clue; I don’t know Spartan’s plans for it. It could just be a thing that happened that they’d like everyone to forget real soon, like the time they ran out of water in Vermont or the time Joe De Sena met the queen of England and farted on her. I also don’t know if the potential value even warrants the kind of development that would be necessary to make it good.

Leave a comment

Filed under Apps, Funny

Super-Late Goals Review

So, back in September I set my monthly goals as usual, and then did nothing with them for almost two months. Which clever readers will realize makes them somewhat less than monthly.

September turned out to be pretty awful. As did the start of October; a lot of stressful and expensive career-related asshattery happened in rapid succession, and I tend not to cope with that too well. It led to quite a mental shutdown on my part, which only really resolved itself with the Bourbon Chase.

Nevertheless: Here’s what happened.

Weight: Goal was a 252 7-day average. That wound up not happening; instead, weight went up by a pound. Weight this year has been weird: On one side, I haven’t been losing weight the way I wanted. But I also haven’t been gaining, despite how miserable a lot of things have been this year.

Hills: My goals were to do a weekly hill run and run stairs after each class at my gym. The hill runs were nearly okay—I think I missed one, in a particularly bad week, head-wise, which had the repercussion of not running at all. The stairs goal was a bit less effective; it’s hard and boring to run stairs when you’re really tired, which of course is the time you should do it, but…

Burpees: My gym did a 1,000-burpee workout at the end of September, and my goal was to not die. I didn’t die, so that’s good. There’s more to come about that.

5K: Before the Bourbon Chase, I ran the Harvest Hop 5K at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. My goal was 26:00, which I didn’t quite make—I finished in 26:09. But that was kind of miraculous—an improvement of 15 seconds over last year, and I was expecting to do far, far worse.

I’m not sure if I’m planning to do goals for the rest of the year. I took a week off after the Bourbon Chase, since I don’t have any more events in the immediate future, and it was nice; it might be worthwhile to extend the rest for a little while while I figure out my plans for next year. I kind of doubt it, but I might do a set of goals that run to the end of the year. But we shall see…

Leave a comment

Filed under Bourbon Chase, Goals, Running

Bourbon Chase: Fears that Didn’t Pan Out

Before the Bourbon Chase, I came up with a list of fears that I was worried about. Happily, most of them didn’t pan out. Here’s the run-down.

Chafing: I had a bit, but not enough to really cause any pain. It was only even remotely noticeable after my first and longest leg, and that was only if my shirt slid across my nipple in the wrong way. Wearing compression gear did, in fact, help.

Pooping myself: I know I went on about this a lot, but I wasn’t the only one concerned. In fact, Tahnee stole some toilet paper in the event that someone had to clean up in a distant, distant stand of woods before they could be permitted back in the van. Fortunately, this didn’t happen; my compatriots and I finished the race without having soiled ourselves.

Getting sick: Fortunately, and slightly surprisingly, didn’t happen, even though…

Not sleeping: This definitely happened. I slept only a couple hours the night before my flight, since I had to be up at about 3:30 to get to the airport and I tend to sleep poorly when I’m in a non-standard situation. Then at the hotel the day before the race I also didn’t sleep well, and only managed a couple hours. During the race itself, while we had a couple stops for rest (in a park in Danville and in a high school gymnasium), I didn’t actually manage to sleep at all. I definitely under-packed; I should have brought a mat and a sleeping bag, like smarter people on my team did, although that would have required acquiring a mat and a sleeping bag.

Stinky Vans: Nothing egregious. It probably happened, and we all felt pretty disgusting by the end, but it was a gradual, get-accustomed-to-being-in-the-monkey-house situation rather than a let’s-suddenly-form-a-human-centipede one.

Moist Towlette Burn: Happily, my Wet Ones were wet but not egregiously acidic.

Bears, Angry Hillbillies, or Angry Hillbilly Bears: Apart from one adorable killer dachshund, no one tried to eat us.

Big Four Bridge

We even had the energy the next day to cross the Big Four pedestrian bridge which goes to a whole other state!

Pain: The runs actually felt pretty good. The hills were tough because I’m not used to them (they probably weren’t actually terribly difficult hills), and the third leg was tough because it was the third leg and I was pre-exhausted for it, but I was pleasantly surprised by how I held up.

Having to run an extra leg: This didn’t happen. I probably would have survived if I had been one of the ones who had to; as it was I arguably had the easiest assignment, as my total distance was only average and my legs happened at fairly easy times of the day, so I maybe should have taken on an extra short leg. But I didn’t.

Letting down my team: I hope not. My legs didn’t fall off and my pace was in line with what was projected. If I let them down, they were very kind and didn’t mention it.

Not liking bourbon: Well, it’s better than Malört.

The entire Bourbon Chase saga:
My initial fears
Leg 1
An early photo set
Leg 2
Leg 3
The end of the race
Other amusing stuff that happened
Were those initial fears justified?

8 Comments

Filed under Bourbon Chase, Funny, Running

Playboy, Pride, and Other Bourbon Chase Funny Miscellany

In a way, I feel like my writing about the Bourbon Chase so far hasn’t quite captured the spirit of the thing. It’s a weird experience, running and then driving and then maybe sleeping and then running more and being trapped in a van with people in rural Kentucky and there’s bourbon but you don’t really drink much and so on and so forth.

And while that last sentence did a lot to accurately convey the experience, I do have a few other funny, interesting, weird, or generally miscellaneous things I’d like to share.

Bourbon Chase Welcolme in Louisville Airport

We done got welcomed, biznatches.

Folf

Four of us arrived via plane fairly early on Thursday morning with some time to kill before we could check into our hotel. After coffee and playing in a park for a while, we did the only rational thing: Foot golf. Basically, golf with a soccer ball. There was a quasi-dedicated course (in that it had specific Folf holes, but they were on the regular course; I’m still not sure exactly how that worked.) It was a lot of fun; I had decent distance but bad direction on my drives, and atrocious putting. It should happen more often.

Playboy
That was the first thing I saw upon entering the hotel room the night before the race: an issue of Playboy. But that requires a bit of explanation: The circle of friends and acquaintances and whatever I was that made up the team only produced a total of 10 people who were willing and able to do the race. Full teams are 12 people, so we went to the Bourbon Chase forums to find extra runners. We wound up getting one, and the Playboy was his.

Now, I’ve got nothing against Playboy, really. It’s a perfectly good soon-to-be-former source of pornography, and it is entirely possible to read it for the articles once you’ve plastered the walls. I’ve even attended a speech by Christie Hefner while she was CEO. (Sadly, the speech was dreadfully boring; she was the keynoter at my former employer’s annual conference, and I could have written her speech in my sleep.)

But it is an odd thing to leave lying on top of your suitcase to greet people you’ve never met before in a hotel room that you’ll be sharing. (Yes, I’m calling something odd. Mark the day.) And, I’m ashamed to admit, that did color our attitudes throughout the weekend. Before long we started assuming that our eleventh was a serial killer or four. He wasn’t; at least, not to us. But we’ve still got our suspicions. In any event, it’s some nice color for the report.

Getting lost
It didn’t happen too often, but there were a few times we got lost traveling in our big creepy white van from hand-off to hand-off. The van’s favorite time getting lost was when we found ourselves at a dead-end of a dirt road in the middle of Kentucky, being chased by a dachshund. It was adorable.

The dessert enchilada
There was a point at which this seemed like a really good idea. Surprisingly, I think it was before dark on the first day. Anyhow, don’t steal that idea.

Rainbow Port-a-Potties in KentuckyPride-a-potties
The hand-off after (I think) leg 13 took place on the grounds of a Baptist church. With this collection of rainbow port-a-potties. I’m not sure if that’s a sign of progressiveness that the Baptist church has a gay pride section, or if it’s an insult that it’s where you poo. [These last two bits probably were stolen from Tahnee.]

Peeing while running
Apparently it’s possible to do, for the gentlemen at least, in a way that’s external to your pants. Matt claimed that it’s possible to discretely disemshortpants one’s pinot noir (or blanc), aim in a sideways and downwind manner, and relieve oneself without slowing. I declined to attempt it.

You know you’re in Kentucky when…
At the hotel the day after the race, I saw a girl, maybe 12 years old, in an American Pharaoh T-shirt. With a toy horse. Galloping. It’s good to have passion.

Post-Race Time
We had most of another day in Louisville before our flight home. Things done included a coffee shop where this happened:

Toilet with adjacent chair

My theory is so that someone could conduct a job interview while pooping.

Incidentally, at that coffee shop we ran into our Playboy-reading serial killer friend’s doppelganger. At least, we hope it was his doppelganger; he had the same build, same mustache, same sunglasses, and same man-bun. If it was the same guy, not talking to him would have been awkward.

At a street fair of some sort, this happened:

Me and a bunny with a beer.

In the basket? Tums.

Tahnee, Theresa, and me getting the best possible photo of the World’s Largest Louisville Slugger. Which is made of not-ash, and therefore not a Louisville Slugger.

Taking a picture of a giant Louisville SluggerOne more installment to come! Tomorrow I’ll review the terrors that I felt beforehand to see which ones were silly and which ones were actually planning to kill me.

The entire Bourbon Chase saga:
My initial fears
Leg 1
An early photo set
Leg 2
Leg 3
The end of the race
Other amusing stuff that happened
Were those initial fears justified?

7 Comments

Filed under Bourbon Chase, Funny, Photos, Running

Bourbon Chase, Part the Whatever

After my final leg, and the rest of my van’s final legs, we had some time for lunch (the quattro stagioni pizza at Crust was delicious) and some rest at the hotel. Which we shared with a very orange bodybuilding competition. We didn’t rumble.

There was one more bit of running a few hours later, though. As is customary, the team came together at the end to cross the finish line together, which was a nice touch.

Somewhat less nice, the finish line was in downtown Lexington, adjacent to Rupp Arena, on an evening when there was an NBA going on, which made parking tough. Now, at this point you might be thinking, “I didn’t know Lexington, Kentucky had an NBA team,” and you would be right. But it’s preseason, and the whole league has gone mad.

Anyhow, video exists of Excalibourbon crossing the finish line, though it’s not easy to get to. Go to https://results.chronotrack.com/e…/results/event/event-16547; type either Excalibourbon or 1093 in the search box where it says “Type name or bib,” click on the Excalibourbon box that pops up, click the video that pops up, sit through a 15-second ad, and then watch us running for 13 seconds.

Me with my Bourbon Chase medalAfter finishing, and getting the requisite medal, we had some time in the finishing Festival/Hootenanny/Party of Death. (Death not included.) As one might expect, this consisted mostly of bourbon tastings from the distilleries we’d run through. It wasn’t all-you-could-guzzle, though, which is either depressing or a blindingly obvious necessity. We got four samples, not nearly enough to try them all (there were maybe 10ish distilleries, and most had at least a couple options). I can’t say I minded—I didn’t particularly like any of them, which says more about my thoughts on bourbon generally than the specific products available.

Overall thoughts about the event? I really enjoyed it, which I wasn’t expecting to. Visiting the distilleries was neat, my runs were, for the most part, awfully scenic (or very dark) and the event had a grandiosity that makes it a nice culmination to a year of training. My van also had a really good time with each other, which is nice—most of us knew and liked each other beforehand, but we’ve never spent a day and a half in a sweaty van together. We still like each other afterward (or else there’s something they aren’t telling me), which is a good thing.

The event was really well run, which given the number of moving pieces is really impressive. The only unforced error I can think of is having the finish line adjacent to an NBA game, and even that was pretty minor. I didn’t experience any problems with the necessary stuff like route signage or check-in, and there were bits like the clever safety videos or the Grand Stanford Cocoa Givingness that were above and beyond.

I’m not sure if I’d do something like this again, though. As much as I did enjoy it, it was expensive (not in the sense that we were being bilked—just that we needed to pay for stuff like 2 vans and hotels and gas and two days of food and the like) in both money and time. So I’m not opposed to doing it again, but given a choice, I’d probably be less interested in this than I would in doing an extra OCR or something else. Were I more of a fan of pure running I would probably think differently, and this would be a great event to do again.

And even though I’ve finished, there’s still MORE TO COME!!!

The entire Bourbon Chase saga:
My initial fears
Leg 1
An early photo set
Leg 2
Leg 3
The end of the race
Other amusing stuff that happened
Were those initial fears justified?

7 Comments

Filed under Bourbon Chase, Running

Bourbon Chase, Leg 3 and Environs

When last we left our intrepid heroes, we were in Stanford, Kentucky, gratefully enjoying refreshments and toilets and a warm building in the middle of a chilly night. I don’t have a whole lot of memory for details after that, except that I managed to navigate us wrongly leaving that station, and as a result we got to the next hand-off about twelve seconds before our runner did. But nothing died, I hope, so let’s just count that part of the things that happen category.

There were a couple more legs before we handed off to van 2, just a few miles from Danville, where we’d started this round of legs. And that’s a very mild pun: our legs did form a loop, starting and nearly ending at the same street corner. But not quite: Leg 5 ended at the same street corner that leg 1 started, but leg 6 still had to run. So it was more of a Q than a loop. It really annoyed Tahnee, who felt that the race would have been a lot shorter if we had run directly from Louisville to Lexington, and she is right, although a small amount of the point might have been lost had that happened.

Anyhow, after that we had more rest time—indoors this time. A high school, I think back in Danville, opened its locker rooms, toilets, cafeteria and gymnasium to racers for a small donation. The shower was glorious, although perhaps an indictment of the city’s educational priorities: the men’s showers were in the football facility, which was nice in that “we have adequate funding” sort of way. The toilets were in the school proper, and the men may well have been using what had been a girl’s bathroom: no urinals, three toilets but only one with a stall around it, and only two out of three sinks worked. Or maybe this is a southern friendliness thing; Tahnee in particular noted that there were a lot of toilets without stall doors or stalls at all. But who am I to judge?

The gym floor was a gym floor; not particularly comfortable (my fault for not bringing a sleeping bag or a mat) but dark. I didn’t actually sleep, but being horizontal was nice. Plus, you can use T-shirts as blankets, at least for your arms.

After a couple hours it was time to book it to our next hand-off point. It happened sooner than we expected—the school was maybe 40 minutes from the next drop-off point, and as we were getting ready to leave we got a message that the last runner was about 40 minutes away.

I think we made it on time, but I pissed that away. Literally—I had to pee, and had to wait in line at port-a-potties, and when I got done and arrived at the hand-off point my partner was already there.

The leg itself was rated easy. It was definitely short, only 3.4 miles (and when did I become a person who described “3.4 miles” as “only”?) but it didn’t seem particularly less hilly than my other ones. It felt hard, but I suspect most of that was not sleeping and having already run twice and being early in the morning and cold and stuff like that.

The coolest part was crossing the High Bridge, or more likely a Nearly as High Bridge Adjacent to the High Bridge. These bridges cross high (whoa!) above the Kentucky River. In fact, I couldn’t see the river—the cold morning left some dense fog underneath the bridge. I could see treetops underneath me poking out of the clouds, though, which was awfully neat.

Most of the rest of the route was through back country roads, also very pretty, until the hand-off and ensuing collapse. Of myself, not the bridge. Sorry, I should have been more clear. I also had to not gloat that I was done while the rest of my team still had to run; I’m not sure how well I did at that.

And despite being done, there’s still MORE TO COME!

The entire Bourbon Chase saga:
My initial fears
Leg 1
An early photo set
Leg 2
Leg 3
The end of the race
Other amusing stuff that happened
Were those initial fears justified?

7 Comments

Filed under Bourbon Chase, Running

(So Much For) Liveblogging the Bourbon Chase: Leg 2

As it turns out, the Bourbon Chase is tough to live-blog. I could blame the lack of cell reception in many places on the course—much of it is in rural Kentucky, after all—but the real reason is that I was too bloody tired to think. But more about that later…

My second leg was probably the one that felt the best. I took off at about 9:30 pm, from Danville (or maybe Danbury?) so it was an all-dark leg. Bourbon Chase does require both front and back lights for runners, so that wasn’t an issue.

But that’s getting ahead of myself. See, the format of the relay is 12 runners (normally) divided into 2 vans. I was the leadoff runner for the team, so my second leg—leg #13 overall—took place several hours after the last runner in our van (that would be #6). Which means that we had a few hours to rest before my leg. We spent that in Danville (my apologies if it is actually Danburg), which was nicely equipped to handle us. In fact, we were invited to nap in Constitution Square, a park downtown where the state constitution had been signed in 1792. I didn’t actually manage to nap—I have huge difficulty napping at all in the rest of life—but it was surprisingly comfortable to just lie down and rest on the grass, even though I hadn’t prepared for it. (I didn’t have anything like a sleeping bag or a mat or anything—just a sweatshirt and a pair of sweatpants, but even though the night was chilly that turned out to be enough.)

Miss Piggy Read Poster, somewhere in KentuckyI’m pretty sure we ate dinner in Danville. I don’t remember the restaurant, although it had an awesome metal gecko-shaped lamp stuck to the window. (Naturally, rather than photographing it, I took a photo of this poster, featuring Miss Piggy, which was produced by my former employer.)

There was also a cool coffee shop, the Hub, that wisely stayed open all night and, hopefully, made a deserved killing. I didn’t have anything, since my team went there to await the start of my leg and I didn’t want anything in my belly, but the hot chocolate sounded incredible.

The leg itself was a lot of fun. It was a neat sensation to run at night, and evenings are generally when I’m at my best anyhow. It was about four and a half miles, leaving town and then running on a highway. So it probably wasn’t a terribly scenic run, but being at night meant it didn’t matter much.

I never felt any danger from running on the highway at night—it was plenty big enough for drivers to move away from us as they passed by us, and people seemed to be happy to give us space. One interesting thing that occurred, though: There was one point where another person was running up to pass me from behind*, and he was close enough that I could see the light from his headlamp. Then, I saw his light veer off to the left and panicked: Did I just miss a turn-off? ‘Cause that would be bad in the middle of the night.

Naturally, he had just looked over to the side. The route was well-signed, and any place where there weren’t street lights the signs had flashing lights on them for visibility.

I think the route was less hilly than my first leg. It was rated “easy”, where the first one was rated “difficult.” It definitely started with a lengthy (but fairly gentle) downhill. But… it’s hard for me to really gauge how hard the hills were. As in, I didn’t finish that leg thinking, “Wow, that leg was a lot less hilly than the first one.” I don’t have any reason to doubt the race maps; I just don’t have a great perception about rating hills while I’m doing them, I guess.

The leg ended, and I think the pace was a bit faster than the first one, although by this point we as a team had become a lot less precise in our timing.

Bourbon Chase Handoff in Stan(d)ford?After the leg, well, more running happened, but what stands out the most is the hand-off that took place in Stanford (possibly Standford). I think this a photo of it, notable for the lightning-fastness of Jamie handing off to Theresa, although it had less importance than something I didn’t photograph. See, this hand-off took place at about 2 am, and Stan(d)ford went way the hell all out for it. They had a DJ, who was awesome even though no one was really listening to him, and indoor toilets rather than portapotties, and, most bestest, the Stan(d)ford Arts Center gave us refreshments. Indoor, on a really cold night, including cocoa, bananas, cookies, chips, and peanut butter on crackers. They were the best tasting things ever. MORE TK.

*In case you’re counting kills—and you shouldn’t be, it’s a bit of a twatty practice—I don’t think he would get one for me, since I passed him back before the end of the leg.

The entire Bourbon Chase saga:
My initial fears
Leg 1
An early photo set
Leg 2
Leg 3
The end of the race
Other amusing stuff that happened
Were those initial fears justified?

7 Comments

Filed under Bourbon Chase, Running